quibble over trifles
keeping sanity on the brink.
quibble over trifles
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I shall be catching sleep soon! Good night!
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art-and-fury:

The Wind Portal - Najla El Zein
art-and-fury:

The Wind Portal - Najla El Zein
art-and-fury:

The Wind Portal - Najla El Zein
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artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Maxwell McMaster | on Tumblr (USA)
Maxwell McMaster is an artist/designer currently residing in Los Angeles, California. He likes to think of his work as an ever evolving story. He has been drawing cartoons, making graffiti and illustrating before engaging himself to fine art. His inspiration comes from his city, pop culture, nature, his friends, and other artists.
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Maxwell McMaster]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Maxwell McMaster | on Tumblr (USA)
Maxwell McMaster is an artist/designer currently residing in Los Angeles, California. He likes to think of his work as an ever evolving story. He has been drawing cartoons, making graffiti and illustrating before engaging himself to fine art. His inspiration comes from his city, pop culture, nature, his friends, and other artists.
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Maxwell McMaster]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Maxwell McMaster | on Tumblr (USA)
Maxwell McMaster is an artist/designer currently residing in Los Angeles, California. He likes to think of his work as an ever evolving story. He has been drawing cartoons, making graffiti and illustrating before engaging himself to fine art. His inspiration comes from his city, pop culture, nature, his friends, and other artists.
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Maxwell McMaster]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Maxwell McMaster | on Tumblr (USA)
Maxwell McMaster is an artist/designer currently residing in Los Angeles, California. He likes to think of his work as an ever evolving story. He has been drawing cartoons, making graffiti and illustrating before engaging himself to fine art. His inspiration comes from his city, pop culture, nature, his friends, and other artists.
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Maxwell McMaster]
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artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
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spiritualinspiration:

www.facebook.com/naeemcallaway
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adambatchelor:
Raffles Pitcher-Plant (Nepenthes rafflesiana) x Icelandic Poppy(Papaver nudicaule)
A somewhat crude and unusual encounter between two geographically and behaviourally different plants, one native to sub-polar regions of the North, whilst beautiful and lightly fragrant, all parts of this plant are considered poisonous. The other, a slightly carnivorous, exotic and threatened plant from South East Asia, feeds on the gooey soluble nutrients of fallen insects actually has many properties beneficial to humans, the roots can treat stomach aches and dysentery and the stem may be used to treat coughs and fevers.
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The sun burned me all right.
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louweezwee:

I am ready to go back to this place and take @catherinealyce with me. 🚗 by throughthetinylens http://ift.tt/1u0n5kl
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"cause your a sky full of stars, I’m gonna give you my heart.
I don’t care if you tear me apart
I don’t care if you do”
—Coldplay

I will only stop this craziness if you stop visiting my dreams.